What is Proprioception / Balance of the Ankle?

Proprioception is also known as the Joint Position System (JPS).  JPS is a system that allows the joints to send a continuous stream of information to the brain about muscle use, joint position and movement.  This allows us to know subconsciously where our limbs are in space without looking and it’s also the sense that produces sudden reflex actions when we sense danger. For example, close your eyes..... do you know exactly how your hands are placed? Of course you do! That’s your proprioception at work. Co-ordination JPS is very important for co-ordinating all our movements and in ter...
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Are Ankle Braces Useful?

There is a lot of misinformation being circulated about ankle braces and their effect on the body and athletic performance. Why Use a Brace or Support? A support brace helps you by: Relieving your pain Resting the injured tissues by taking some of the stressful loads Protecting the injured structures from further injury Allowing for initial tissue healing Preventing future injury by support or joint stabilisation.   A hinged style ankle brace that allows full up and down ankle range of motion will not weaken the joint because the brace is allowing unrestricted...
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5 QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT ANKLE SPRAINS

When should I see a Physio?The first reason to see a physio is to be evaluated for a fracture. Signs of a fracture include the inability to bear weight following the injury or if there is tenderness over the bony protrusions of the ankle or foot. In these situations X-rays should be performed to assess for a fracture. Another reason to seek medical advice is to reduce the risk of recurrent or chronic ankle problems. The most important risk factor for ankle sprains is a previous ankle sprain. Therefore, individuals should seek medical guidance and possibly formal rehabilitation to prevent ...
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Foot Mechanics: There’s more to keep in mind than just what your feet are doing. 

Running mechanics have been a hot topic of discussion - from the barefoot crazy to custom-made orthotics, it is possible to find someone who swears by ‘their’ style of running. Many running stores have treadmills with recording equipment set up to help find “the right shoe for your mechanics”. So what is different when you have your gait analysed by a physical therapist? A comprehensive analysis performed by a physical therapist looks at the foot mechanics in several ways — a non-weight bearing state, standing, walking, running at pace (i.e. endurance vs. sprint) and after fatigue. It is...
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What is a high ankle sprain?

  Unlike other ankle sprains, this injury is sustained to the tissue (ligaments) that connect the tibia and the fibula.  These are the bones that make up the lower leg (the inner bone being the tibia or shin and the outer being the fibula). With common ankle sprains “low ankle sprains” the ligaments that are most often injured are the ones on the outside of the ankle.  These help to connect the fibula to the foot.  These ligaments are injured when someone “rolls” their ankle over. In the high ankle sprain, there are several structures potentially damaged.  These include ligaments...
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Strengthening the ankle joint!!

The ankle is a complex hinge joint that is primarily defined by the shin bone (tibia) and its meeting with the talus bone on top of the foot. There are several other bones that surround this meeting, as well as all the muscles, ligaments and tendons that make these bones moveable in several directions. Let’s focus on how to prevent ankle pain and injury by improving the joint’s overall function. Running and sports that involve agility are usually the cause of most ankle injuries, and these usually stem from the joint and tissues that surround it not being strong, mobile or stable enough to c...
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How Do I know If I’ve Rolled My Ankle?

An ankle sprain is a common injury. Inversion ankle sprains are the most common, making up 85% of all ankle sprains. It is know that the incidence of lateral ligament injuries is the most common amongst the sporting population and the consequence of not rehabilitating after an initial injury increases the chances of recurrence. • Presents with history of inversion injury or forceful eversion injury to the ankle. May have previous history of ankle injuries or instability. • May be unable to weight-bear through the limb. • Potential description of a cold foot or parathesia • Tenderness...
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Ankle Sprains

Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are one of the most common sports injuries. As a result they have a high economic burden with direct and indirect costs associated with the injury.   From a clinical point of view, the problem with LAS is that there is a very high recurrence rate and 20% of the general population and 30-50% of the athletic population will go on to suffer from chronic ankle symptoms (pain, swelling and instability); also known as chronic ankle instability (Gribble et al., 2016, Attenborough et al., 2015 & Tanen et al., 2014). It is believed that contributing factors to...
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Patellar Tendon Pain

Patellar Tendinopathy is most commonly characterised by pain localised to the inferior pole of the knee cap and load related pain which increases the demand on the knee extensors. Risk factors include being 15-30 years old, males are affected more than females, involvement in jump/lunging sports and training loads. Pathology occurs because there is an ↑ tenocyte numbers, ↑ ground substance, swelling, matrix degeneration and neovascular growth. Presentation is generally pain localised to the inferior pole of the patella, load related pain (knee extensors). Regional findings sometimes p...
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Do’s And Dont’s of OA Knee Pain

Do: Choose Low-Impact Exercises Low-impact aerobic exercises such as walking, biking, and swimming are considered joint-friendly. They help build strength around the affected joints and keep them aligned and functioning properly. Don’t: Engage in Repetitive, High-Impact Exercises Joint-pounding exercises such as running and tennis can tax your already damaged knees. You stop using your muscle because it hurts, you lose strength, and then your alignment isn’t good either Do: Incorporate Strength and Flexibility Training A fitness plan for osteoarthritis should include strength and fl...
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